Features

The Decade in American Islamophobia

To me, 9/11 took a city I love and broke my heart. As a turning point in American history, this moment took the racial diversity in New York City and quickly turned that complexity into suspicion, scapegoating, and racism – heralding the Age of Terror in which Islamophobia and anti-Muslim racism are widespread.

A Decade of Detention: The Post 9/11 Immigrant Dragnet

Immigration law, once a set of civil administrative rules to regulate population flow – has become part of the enforcement apparatus of a government that functions increasingly as a police state. The politics of fear have changed the whole nature of the immigration system.

On 9/11 and the War on "Terror": Names, Numbers and Events

Categories and names are often misleading, even for those of us who are often wary of the dominant rhetoric. As much as we want to escape it, dominant discourse is only there to shape our ideas and reactions, as is the case of the rhetoric surrounding 9/11; of good and evil, of war, liberation, and of spreading democracy.   Here, we write to challenge these slogans and policies hoping that one day they will go away.

Disappeared Men and Searching Women: Human Rights and Mourning in Kashmir

Ather Zia documents how women who live with shadows of disappeared loved ones organize around human rights.  Her work chronicles the Kashmir conflict’s gendered violences that shape how these women continue to resist Indian militarism. 

Reflections from the Valley of Controlled Chaos

Mohsin Mohi-Ud Din gives us vignettes of his cultural work in Kashmir against the brutal terrain of violent conflict that are simultaneously hopeful and melancholic.  He points to promulgation of the word “normalcy” as a way to deny the distinct and jarring contrasts in Kashmiri life. 

 

Erasures and Resistance: What Peter King’s Hearing Said. And What It Didn’t.

Representative Peter King’s (R-NY) first hearing on the radicalization of American Muslim communities exemplified the right wing’s ongoing commitment to constructing the idea of a radical, threatening Islam.  The hearing also exposed what is, at best, liberal acquiescence, and, at worst, liberal partnership in that dangerous agenda.   Most profoundly, the hearing made clear the extent to which the war on terror has robbed public discourse of any meaningful vocabulary for contesting the universe in which Islam poses legitimate concern for the American public.

Hunting the “Out-of-Place Muslim”

The Global War on Terror’s fixation on al-Qa‘ida as a roving band of "foreign fighters" allows the U.S. to claim that it is not fighting a war on Islam, but rather helping local Muslim populations rid themselves of narrow-minded interlopers  seeking to impose a puritanical brand of the religion.  This hunt for foreign fighters animates broader attempts to monitor and control Muslim diasporas outside the "west."  At the same time, the legal impunity of other foreign fighters – namely, U.S. forces and their contractors – is pushed into the background.

The Arab World’s Forgotten Rebellions: Foreign Workers and Biopolitics in the Gulf

Both the Arab Spring and Gulf worker actions are, broadly, about dignity and justice; both challenge the status quo of unaccountable family/security-states; and both are met with ferocious responses by those states.  Yet, the Gulf worker actions are ignored. Why?

On the Erasure of Violence and the Violence of Erasure

I have just characterized the killing of our lifetime’s Public Enemy Number 1, as an act of violence. The association is disconcerting. It does not readily compute. But what else does one call an act that requires the raiding of a home, and the shooting of an unarmed man, and others, until they are dead?

Women at the Center: War and Peace in Nepal

Women's voices must emerge as a voice of sustainable peace and the vision for the future of Nepal. From combatants to those left to rebuild the social structures at the war's end, women's roles are transforming in the country.

Syndicate content