India

Purvi Shah / To shine a light / It is not that

Poems pass through moments, as do our lives. Both poetry and justice necessitate a vision, a series of quiet actions built from contemplation and our own observations. Both poetry & justice necessitate desires, this wanting & wanting more, this knowing & knowing more. This stitching between – a kind of locking of skewed, errant and yet beautiful tiles – is the movement between the world of poetry & this world itself, between the world itself & the world we desire – the world we will one day make.

History of Communalism in India

History and context of how communalism grew in India (part of SAJ-LA's Gujarat Genocide event)

Audio File: 
Podcast Length: 
14:58

Tracks Back Home

Live reading of poem developed for the South Asians for Justice event "Gujarat Genocide and US Solidarity" in Los Angeles, April 2012

Audio File: 
Podcast Length: 
6:29

Towards Critical Solidarity

In SASI's (South Asia Solidarity Initiative) previous two special columns to SAMAR, members focused on campaigns on POSCO, ‘Land Grabs and Corporate Steel’ and the pressing problem of Kashmir, ‘Of Silences, Suffering and Solidarity: Facing South Asia’s “Original Sin.”’  In this column, published on MLK Day, SASI activists raise some questions and tensions in solidarity politics itself.

Tonight in Kashmir

Late at night, alone but not in silence, in the capital city of Kashmir

Of Silences, Suffering and Solidarity: Facing South Asia’s “Original Sin”

A monthly column by South Asia Solidarity Initiative that discusses current social justice issues in South Asia and the imperative of transnational solidarity. This month, Mohamad Junaid and Balmurli Natrajan explore the need for South Asians to rise in solidarity with Kashmiris to set a new foundation for democracy and decency and ask some of the hard questions that the Indian and Pakistani establishments – as well as the Western news media – have been failing to ask.  

Mazdoori and Azadi: A Portrait of Invisible Men in an Invisible City

The day-time bus ride from Bangalore to Chennai is one of those seemingly endless journeys; I picked up the book, Free Man, which I had begun to read a few days earlier. I was on my way back from a job interview with a mainstream newspaper, where I’d applied to work as a reporter, which coincidentally is also the author, Aman Sethi’s occupation.

Land Grabs and Corporate Steel

This new monthly column, contributed by members of the South Asia Solidarity Initiative, discusses current social justice issues in South Asia and the imperative of transnational solidarity. This month features a discussion of the Anti-POSCO campaign mobilized in Orissa, India to protect forest dwellers rights and resist the onslaught of unencumbered foreign direct investment.

Syndicate content