Issue 19: Relief in a Time of Crisis (1/24/2005)

Articles in this Issue

Before this year's refugee camps, there were those from last year, and the year before. A legacy of civil strife complicates any tsunami relief efforts in Sri Lanka.

Nimmi Gowrinathan

A resilient five-year-old survivor named Babli personifies the hope that acid violence against girls and women in Bangladesh can end.

Fariba S. Alam

Two visual artists seek out new ways of engaging with the post-9/11 disappearances in the US

Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti's Bhezti causes an uproar in the Sikh community, pitting free speech against religious tolerance. But are blasphemy laws the answer?

Anjali Wason

Multinational executives from a toy company and their elite Indian counterparts pass time on a train platform.

In Bhopal, the struggle to seek justice goes on, not as compensation, for the loss is too great to be compensated, but rather as a founding virtue of human society.

Somnath Mukherji

We must mourn the capitulation embodied in the Indian Patents Amendment Bill passed in March 2005, but we must celebrate the concessions won by people's movements and left activists.

Raza Mir

Indigenous knowledge saves the native Andamanese from the tsunami, but can it save them from settlers and rapacious development?

Madhusree Mukerjee

A recent World Bank report on the tsunami gives us reason to be vigilant to the forces of corporate globalization using aid as a pretext to advance their agenda.

The tsunami that occurred in December 2004 was clearly one of the deadliest natural disasters the world has seen in recent times. Resulting in over 300,000 deaths, hundreds of thousands more displaced, and massive infrastructure destruction, there is no doubt that concerted and long-term attention needs to be paid to the rebuilding of the affected communities.

Oscar-winning documentary Born into Brothels ignores local organizing efforts and instead gives us more images of white saviors.

Svati Shah

The good mutants work in spaces servicing the global economy. The bad ones want to destroy freedom, democracy, free markets. New mutations are arising in the politics of fear and the War on Terror.

Ali Mir

An introduction to Issue 19

Naomi Klein, in a recent issue of The Nation, describes "the rise of a predatory form of disaster capitalism that uses the desperation and fear created by catastrophe to engage in radical social and economic engineering." The crisis resulting from the earthquake and tsunami in southeast Asia is a stunning illustration of the mushrooming of disaster capitalism. The tsunami was devastating, killing as many as 300,000 people.

SAMAR Collective

Young South Asians protest outside of a Los Angeles hotel when the South Asian Students Association refused to move their conference and dismissed calls for solidarity with boycotting hotel workers advocating for equitable working conditions.

" Are we Rushdie’s "bastard children" of history, hybridity, and violence, from which transformation and tomorrows can generate? What kind of diaspora are we becoming?"

Angana Chatterji

The U.S. slams its doors in the face of one of the architects of the 2002 Gujarat pogroms—and activists from the South Asian diaspora helped set the stage. Sapna Gupta outlines the strategies and victories of the Campaign Against Genocide.

Sapna Gupta

Mukhtar Mai was gang-raped on orders of a tribal court and then paraded naked in town. Rather than suffering in silence, she’s taking her rapists to court, challenging Pakistan’s laws, patriarchal norms, cultural practices and social taboos.

Leena Khan