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Ahalya Satkunaratnam | September 21, 2014

Ahalya Satkunaratnam reflects on how the stories of elders in the website, Iam.lk assist in complicating identity in Sri Lanka and how this site provides a discussion of national history and personal belonging that circumvents hostility that often accompanies web-based discussions of identity, the nation and the war.

Noor Hasan | September 21, 2014

Sajda

On the morning of my sixth or seventh Eid,
My mother dressed me in white Pakistani robes,

Holding my hand gently
As we walked through the bright wooden gates
Of the Islamic Community Center by our house.
I had not yet learned how to pray.

But my mother taught me how to bow in sajda,
The devotion of pressing one’s forehead
To the ground to feel smaller than God
has made you,
to feel as grounded
as feet.

As I lifted my forehead
from the carpeted floor of the mosque,

Recent Articles

How can an event be at once ordinary and extraordinary, simultaneously decisive and indecisive?  The victory of Narendra Modi and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in the Indian parliamentary elections of 2014 is indeed a watershed moment; for the first time in the history of independent India, it will be ruled exclusively by a Hindu supremacist party. And yet, a careful look at the way the Modi/BJP campaign produced this victory yields a picture that can only be characterized as simultaneously ordinary and extraordinary, decisive and indecisive.

In 2006 and 2007, I spent several months in Ahmedabad while on a fellowship from my university in the US. During my time in Ahmedabad, I interacted with the mostly-Hindu NGO staff where I was based, residents of the largely Hindu shantytown where the NGO was working, and professors at Gujarat University. Less than five years had passed since the city had gone through its nightmare: vicious riots involving saffron-clad men entering urban neighborhoods and brutalizing, gang-raping, and burning other human beings. Some 1,500 Muslims were killed.

This issue on Policing Sex explores the wider context of the criminalization of homosexuality in India, as well as visions put forth to challenge heterosexism, the police state, and misogyny. 

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha's poems evoke borders of bodies and nation.

 

Sabelo Narasimhan reflects on this year's Gay Pride parade in Bombay, India. In the wake of the recent judgement criminalizing homosexuality, the images in this photoessay reveal the unbounded spirit of rebellion and resistance of the community.

Radio Samar

Tracks Back Home
Naazneen Diwan, Taz Ahmed

Live reading of poem developed for the South Asians for Justice event "Gujarat Genocide and US Solidarity" in Los Angeles, April 2012

History of Communalism in India
Yasmin Qureshi

History and context of how communalism grew in India (part of SAJ-LA's Gujarat Genocide event)

Zohra Saed | Oct 23, 2013

This fragmented, musical novel breaks the prettiness of memory, brings irreverent humor where it should, shows the crisscross of ethnic neighborhoods in New York City, and celebrates love in the midst of violence. 

Cartoon

Khalil Bendib

Visit Our Friends

South Asian Progressive Action Collective (SAPAC) Chicago-based collective takes up progressive issues pertinent to South Asia and the Diaspora through direct action, creative expression, and discussion.

Ghadar is a forum for Left debate and dialogue through reports on political activism on the ground in South Asia and the diaspora.

Radiostan A Chicago-based monthly radio program that brings you the pulse of desi culture, featuring interviews, performances and discussions with the people who influence the South Asian American community.

Random Five from the Archive

Shahnaz Habib | Issue 24: Untitled (9/26/2006)

"The authors in Voices of Resistance: Muslim Women on War, Faith and Sexuality resist the temptation to simplify Muslimness into one kind—whether geographically, sexually, spiritually or in terms of the many nuances of the Great Veil Debate. Instead, "Iqra" commands the book—"read" the many, the multi-faceted, and the defiant voices of Muslim women. "

Jan 28, 2011
Amna Akbar

Representative Peter King’s (R-NY) first hearing on the radicalization of American Muslim communities exemplified the right wing’s ongoing commitment to constructing the idea of a radical, threatening Islam.  The hearing also exposed what is, at best, liberal acquiescence, and, at worst, liberal partnership in that dangerous agenda.   Most profoundly, the hearing made clear the extent to which the war on terror has robbed public discourse of any meaningful vocabulary for contesting the universe in which Islam poses legitimate concern for the American public.

May 31, 2011
Ali Mir | Issue 19: Relief in a Time of Crisis (1/24/2005)

The good mutants work in spaces servicing the global economy. The bad ones want to destroy freedom, democracy, free markets. New mutations are arising in the politics of fear and the War on Terror.

Jan 28, 2011
Junaid Rana | Issue 15: Dogmas of War (//)

The Position of Muslims in the UK and the US

Jan 28, 2011